Toyin Saraki welcomes global partners to Nigeria; heralds co-operation to save lives of mothers and infants


Wellbeing Foundation Africa Founder-President Toyin Saraki welcomed the Foundation’s global partners Johnson & Johnson to her residence in Abuja on Wednesday to discuss ongoing cooperation and the future of healthcare interventions in Nigeria.

Mrs Saraki, who is also Special Adviser to the Independent Advisory Group of the WHO Africa office, commented:

Wellbeing Foundation Africa Founder-President Toyin Saraki welcomed the Foundation’s global partners Johnson & Johnson to her residence in Abuja on Wednesday to discuss ongoing cooperation and the future of healthcare interventions in Nigeria.

Mrs Saraki, who is also Special Adviser to the Independent Advisory Group of the WHO Africa office, commented:

"I am delighted three years into our ongoing social responsibility partnership to improve Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care across Kwara State, in conjunction with the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, that Johnson & Johnson is making landmark investments in commencing corporate commercial engagement in Nigeria."

"This demonstration of direct investment into personal care product manufacturing in Nigeria will create jobs and improve socio-economic outcomes for Nigerians."

“The Wellbeing Foundation is proud of its work with the Global Community Impact team at Johnson & Johnson. Our healthcare worker training programme in Kwara has resulted in a 15% reduction in maternal case fatality rate and a 38% reduction in the still birth rate in health care facilities where the project is implemented.”

“Our training is so successful because it takes place in facilities and equips doctors, nurses and midwives, as a collective team, with the skills needed to overcome these obstetric emergencies. The innovation that our approach unleashes is inspirational – my favourite example is the use of a condom-catheter balloon, filled with saline, to control postpartum haemorrhage, the excessive bleeding after birth which is the leading cause of maternal mortality and affects up to 5% of women.”

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